Researcher discovers flaws in Telekom’s server

Ebrahim Hegazy, an Egyptian researcher, has found another vulnerability that affected the Web servers of Deutsche Telekom, Germany's biggest telecommunications provider.

He discovered the bug on the website, on one of the subdomains that displayed a generic landing page. The subdomain translates to, and seems to be an abandoned Web page left behind from previous site iterations.

According to the researcher, attackers could have gained full control of the Deutsche Telekom server.
The researcher said that the vulnerability was the most basic example of Remote Code Execution (RCE) vulnerability that allows attackers to gain full control of a Web server just by pinging its ports and open connections with malicious requests.

Having brute-forced the URL, Hegazy came across an upload.php file. The researcher built a tool called Pemburu for pen testing.

He managed to find the URL, which the upload.php file sent user-submitted data. His tool went through a large set of URL variations and eventually discovered that the file sent data to This allowed Hegazy to take a closer look at the code.

He came across a mechanism that acquired user input from the HTTP POST request without sanitizing it in any way and then attached the data as parameters to the PHP system function.

This particular function is modeled after the system function in C and allows PHP developers to execute shell commands from inside their PHP app and retrieve the results. Generally, it's considered a good practice not to use this function on any front-facing Web server.

He reported about the flaw to the telco's security team. The flaw has been patched.

As per a report published in Softpedia said that his research was carried out as part of the company's bug bounty program and received a €2,000 / $2,150 reward.

Danske bank fixes several vulnerabilities that could allow hackers to get into bank accounts

Most of us prefer to keep money at our bank accounts than to keep at home as we believe that banks are safer in comparison to our homes. But, you must get panicked, once you read a blog post by Sijmen Ruwhof, Freelance IT Security Consultant and an Ethical Hacker.

He has published a bank review entitled “How I could hack internet bank accounts of Danish largest bank in a few minutes”  in which he revealed that any hacker could easily get into the website of Danske Bank, one of the largest banks of Denmark, and get access to the users accounts.

His in-depth technical post explains the extent to which Danske Bank is vulnerable to hacking.

He discovered the vulnerability in August when he got intrigued with the idea of testing Bank’s security while interacting with a group of Danish hackers at the Chaos Communication Camp (CCC), near Berlin.

During the interacting program, security experts and Whitehat hackers were disappointed with the terrible security implementations adopted by many Danish Banks.

“I opened up the Danske Bank’s website and was curious to see how the HTML code looked like, so opened the code of the customer login screen of the banking environment. I strolled thru the code to get a grasp of the technology used,” the security researcher wrote in the blog.

Then he saw JavaScript comments that seemed to contain internal server information. Not just a few variables, but quite a lot of confidential data.

“It was in URL encoded format, so I decoded it right away. Really wondering what kind of secrets it contained,” he added. I was shocked. Is this happening for real? In less than a minute on their web site, this is just the HTML code of the login screen, one of the most visited pages of Danske Bank’s web site.”

The researcher said that he could see IP address of a probable customer via variable HTTP_CLIENTIP while visiting Danske Bank’s website. Similarly, HTTP_USER_AGENT contains an operating system and web browser details.

He warned that variable HTTP_COOKIE was visible and full of information; credentials of a customer could be hijacked in a very few time.

According to the researcher, Danske Bank doesn’t use a secure HTTPS connection to transport customer banking traffic; as variable HTTPS was OFF and SERVER_PORT carried value 80. The bank is still using COBOL code on their backend; for (Customer Information Control System) CICS and Database handling.

However, the good news is bank has patched all the vulnerabilities only after the researcher had uploaded his findings on his blog.

Starbucks fixes critical flaws that could allow an attacker to steal users’ credit-cards

Mohamed M. Fouad, an Information Security Consultant from SecureMisr, has discovered a critical flaw in Starbucks that allowed an attacker to steal users’ credit-cards and perform Remote Code Execution.

“I discovered a lot of critical security vulnerabilities at (Starbucks) that can lead to very harmful impact on all users by forcing them to change their passwords, add alternative emails or change anything in their store profile settings and steal users’ stored credit-cards. It can also perform phishing attack on users and remote code execution on Starbucks servers,” the Egyptian researcher said in a blog post.

According to the researcher, Remote File Inclusion Vulnerability occurs when a file from any location can be injected into the attacked page and included as source code for parsing and execution. It allowed me to able to perform:

         -  Code execution on the web server.

          - Code execution on the client-side such as JavaScript which can lead to other    attacks   such as cross site scripting (XSS).

         -  Data theft/manipulation via phishing attack to steal users accounts that contain Credit cards and payment orders information.

The researcher started his research a year ago when there was a Zero-Day for Starbucks about iOS Mobile Application and "Insecure Data Storage" vulnerability was detected.

While he was searching about Starbucks hacking news he found another vulnerability two months ago which allowed the attackers to steal Starbucks users gift cards and duplicate funds on Starbucks gift cards.

“I noticed 2 months ago that Starbucks joined bug bounty programs. So my passion lead me to take a look on Starbucks  looking for a vulnerabilities in Starbucks until I found two major vulnerabilities which allow an attacker to perform Remote Code Execution on Starbucks server also phishing attacks via Remote File Inclusion Vulnerability and another one it was critical also about CSRF store account take over by just one-click. Starbucks store account contains payment history,” he added.

However, Starbucks confirmed that it has fixed the vulnerabilities.

Apple claims to have fully fixed a critical iOS Airdrop vulnerability, which researcher says it doesn’t

Some days ago, Mark Dowd, a security researcher, discovered a critical flaw in iOS 9 that allows an attacker within Bluetooth range of an iPhone to install malicious apps using the Airdrop filesharing feature.

A report published in Ars Technica confirms that after that, the researcher privately reported it to Apple.

Then, Apple released a press statement on Wednesday informing that the vulnerability has been mitigated in iOS 9.

However, the researcher did not stop his research and revealed that the bug still hasn't been fixed.

The mitigations available in Wednesday's release of iOS 9 are one more benefit that security-conscious iPhone users should consider when deciding whether to install the update.

The researcher exploited a directory traversal flaw that allows attackers to write and overwrite files of their choice to just about any file location they want.

The researcher used an enterprise certificate that Apple makes available to developers so large organizations can install custom apps on large fleets of iPhones.

During his research, his technique installs did not generate a dialog that warns the end user that the app is signed by a third party and asking for approval to proceed.

“Another method for bypassing iOS code-signing restrictions would be to combine my Airdrop hack with jailbreak exploit, such as the TaiG jailbreak that Apple recently patched with version 8.4 of iOS,” he said.

He posted a video to show how thw bug allows attackers who briefly have physical access to a vulnerable iPhone or who are within Bluetooth range of it, to install an app that the device will trust without prompting the user with a warning dialog.

Security Bug allows Hackers to take Control of Curiosity Rover's OS

Serious security flaws has been discovered in VxWorks, a real-time operating system made by Wind River of Alameda, California, US, in 1987. The OS is used from network  routers to critical instruments like NASA's Curiosity Rover on Mars and Boeing 787 Dreamliners.

A Canadian researcher Yannick Formaggio presented a detailed significant flaw in VxWorks at 44Con, an information security conference in London. He said that, "VxWorks is the world's most widely used real-time operating system deployed in embedded systems. Its market reach spans across all safety critical fields, including the Mars Curiosity rover, Boeing 787 Dreamliner, network routers to name a few." Formaggio added, "In this age of IoT, the issue will have a widespread impact."

The researcher discovered the flaw after an Istuary client requested about the understanding of the critical  infrastructure industry.

The flaw allowed Formaggio “to target a specific part of the operating system and write to memory on the machine running VxWorks. From there, it was possible to set up a backdoor account and control functions of the operating system."

One of the another major finding of his research was that the “FTP server is susceptible to ring buffer overflow when accessed at a high speed” and crashes when sent a “specially crafted username and password”.

The current version of VxWorks is 7, Versions 653 has the problem, which might have affected many millions of devices and they need to be patched. Wind River has acknowledged the flaw and is in the process of providing patches.

WhatsApp fixed a security flaw that could allow attackers to Hack WhatsApp accounts

Hey people! In order to make sure you are protected, update your WhatsApp Web right now.

Kasif Dekel, a security researcher at Check Point, discovered significant vulnerabilities that exploit the WhatsApp Web logic, allowing attackers to trick victims into executing arbitrary code on their machines .

“All an attacker needed to do to exploit the vulnerability was to send a user a seemingly innocent vCard containing malicious code. Once opened, the alleged contact is revealed to be an executable file, further compromising computers by distributing bots, ransomware, RATs, and other malwares,” the researchers wrote in a blog.

As per the researcher, in order to target an individual, the attacker needs is the phone number associated with the WhatsApp account.

According to Kasif, WhatsApp Web allows users to view any type of media or attachment that can be sent or viewed by the mobile platform/application. This includes images, videos, audio files, locations and contact cards.

While doing the research, he found that by manually intercepting and crafting XMPP requests to the WhatsApp servers, it was possible to control the file extension of the contact card file. This means, once the victim clicks the downloaded file (which he assumes is a contact card), the code inside the batch file runs on his computer.

The researcher said that they were surprised to find that WhatsApp failed to perform any validation on the vCard format or the contents of the file, and when they crafted an exe file into this request, the WhatsApp web client happily let us download the PE file in all its glory.

WhatsApp verified and have deployed deploy an initial mitigation against exploitation of this issue in all web clients, pending an update of the WhatsApp client.

Researchers discover flaws in Kaspersky and FireEye

Researchers have disclosed flaws in products from antivirus software vendors like Kaspersky and FireEye that could be exploited by malicious hackers.

Tavis Ormandy, a security researcher at Google’s Project Zero team, made the vulnerabilities public by tweeting about the successful exploitation Kaspersky's anti-virus product in such a way that users could find their systems easily compromised by malicious hackers.

Ormandy last night tweeted, “Alright, sent Kaspersky some more vulnerabilities to investigate, many obviously exploitable. I'll triage the remaining bugs tomorrow.”

Earlier, he tweeted, “Alright, sent Kaspersky some more vulnerabilities to investigate, many obviously exploitable. I'll triage the remaining bugs tomorrow.”

According to a news report published in Graham Cluley, one has to question the timing of Ormandy's announcement just before a long holiday weekend in the United States, which clearly makes it difficult as possible for a corporation to put together a response for concerned users. I supposed we should be grateful that he at least ensured that Ryan Naraine, a reporter at Kaspersky's Threatpost blog, was cc'd on the announcement.

“None of this, of course, is to say that the vulnerability doesn't sound serious, and Kaspersky would be wise to investigate and fix it at the earliest opportunity. Ideally vulnerabilities should be found by a company's internal team, or ironed out before software ever gets released. And it's better that someone like Ormandy finds a flaw rather than a malicious hacking gang,” the news report added.
At the same time, Kristian Erik Hermansen, another security researcher, revealed that he had found flaws in FireEye's software.

As CSO reports, Kristian Erik Hermansen has disclosed details of a zero-day vulnerability, which - if exploited - can result in unauthorised file disclosure.

He published proof-of-concept code showing that how the vulnerability could be triggered, and claimed that he had found three other vulnerabilities in FireEye's product. All are said to be up for sale.

"FireEye appliance, unauthorized remote root file system access. Oh cool, web server runs as root! Now that's excellent security from a _security_ vendor :) Why would you trust these people to have this device on your network," Hermansen said. Just one of many handfuls of FireEye / Mandiant 0day. Been sitting on this for more than 18 months with no fix from those security "experts" at FireEye. Pretty sure Mandiant staff coded this and other bugs into the products. Even more sad, FireEye has no external security researcher reporting process."

Mozilla patches severe vulnerabilities in its Bugzilla bug tracking system

Mozilla confirmed on September 4 that an attacker, stole its security-sensitive vulnerability information from its Bugzilla bug tracking system and then he got accessed to information about unpatched zero-day bugs.

However, Mozilla has now patched all the flaws that allowed the attacker to get the accessed. Similarly, the company concerned said that it would take its own security more seriously than before.

It is also said that the attacker used it to attack Firefox users, the maker of the open-source Firefox browser warned Friday.

“The attacker acquired the password of a privileged Bugzilla user, who had access to security­sensitive information. Information uncovered in our investigation suggests that the user re­used their Bugzilla password with another website, and the password was revealed through a data breach at that site,” Mozilla said in an FAQ on the breach.

The one bug that was exploited in the wild was used to collect private data from Firefox users who visited a Russian news site.

The attacker accessed approximately 185 bugs that were non-public. Among them, 53 were said to be severe vulnerabilities. Mozilla claims that 43 of the severe flaws had already been patched in the Firefox browser by the time the attacker accessed the bug information. That leaves 10 bugs that the attacker had access to before they were patched, and that's where the potential risk to Firefox users lies.

“The earliest confirmed instance of unauthorized access dates to September 2014. There are some indications that the attacker may have had access since September 2013,” the company said.

The company said that during its investigation it found out that the user re­used their Bugzilla password with another website, and the password was revealed through a data breach at that site.
Firefox security lead Richard Barnes detailed what Mozilla is now doing to improve Bugzilla's security.

"We are updating Bugzilla's security practices to reduce the risk of future attacks of this type," Barnes wrote. "As an immediate first step, all users with access to security-sensitive information have been required to change their passwords and use two-factor authentication."

Ola leaks personal information of its customer, claims a girl

A girl from Chennai claimed that OlaCabs, famous as Ola, a mobile app for personal transportation in India, had sent personal information of more than 100 customers to her via SMS.

Swapnil Midha posted on Facebook that the Ola, which started as an online cab aggregator in Mumbai, now based out of Bangalore and is among the fastest growing businesses in India, leaked personal details such as mobile numbers, locations of users.

However, the company regarded it as a technical fault and confirmed that it has been fixed now.

“About three weeks ago, I booked an Ola cab for a long distance drive. After the ride I received a few garbled texts from "VM-OLACAB" that I didn't think much of and ignored. These messages were alpha-numeric with hashes and made no sense to me whatsoever. I assumed there was some system error and did not anticipate the sleep deprivation that followed,” she wrote on Facebook.

She added, “My phone beeped throughout the night. 1:06, 2:34, 2:37, 2:38, 4:05, 5:17. I couldn't get my head around why these were coming at these times. I then called their call centre the next day to explain that there was probably some sort of bug and my number had somehow gotten into their highly cryptic message transmission systems, whatever secrets they were trying to transmit.”

Although, the Ola assured her to fix the problem soon, she had been receiving SMS after SMS. She received text between 300 and 400.

“I received no further communication from them, no update, no email, just more garbled messages,” she explained. I reached out to them through every channel possible. I called their call centre at least 5 times, demanded to speak to the senior managers, and had to explain my problem each time in great detail, answering the same annoying questions.”

She said that the company shared personal details of their customers throughout the day and throughout the night.

“What scares me the most, is that THIS should be their number one priority. I questioned their lack of concern for privacy and data protection. I threatened to report them to the authorities and TRAI. Nothing seemed to work which makes you think - do they even care about protecting customer information? If they are sending all this to me, who are they sending MY booking details to? Whose number is receiving all of my data? Which creepy criminal knows my full name, my mobile number, my door number, my account details, when I'm home and when I'm out?” she added.

The girl has raised a serious question which the company concerned need to answer as soon as possible. If this, one of the most trusted companies like the Ola does such careless, what do we expect from others?  

PayPal fixes serious vulnerability in its domain

Photo Courtesy: Security Down

A serious flaw in PayPal Holdings Inc, an American company which operates a worldwide online payments system, has been patched. The flaw could have allowed an attacker to trick users into handing over their personal and financial details.

The flaw, which was detected by Ebrahim Hegazy, was caused by a stored cross-site scripting (XSS) bug in the domain, which is used for PayPal’s hosted solution that enables buyers to pay with a payment card or their PayPal account, eliminating the need to capture or store sensitive payment information

“I’ve found a Stored XSS vulnerability that affects the SecurePayment page directly which allowed me to alter the page HTML and rewrite the page content, An attacker can provide his own HTML forms to the user to fullfill and send the users data back to attacker’s server in clear text format, and then use this information to purchase anything in behave of users or even transfere the users fund to his own account,” the researcher posted in his blog.

According to the Egypt-based researcher, a malicious actor could have set up a rogue shopping site or hijacked a legitimate website, and alter the “Checkout” button with a URL designed to exploit the XSS vulnerability.

The flaw could allow the attacker to change the contents of the SecurePayments page and display a phishing page where the victim is instructed to enter personal and financial information. The collected data is then sent back to a server controlled by the attacker, the researcher explained.

The researcher, who had found a serious flaw in Yahoo domain last year, reported about the vulnerability to PayPal on June 19. The payment processor confirmed patching the flaw on August 25.

After that, the company concerned awarded Hegazy $750 for his findings, which is said to be the maximum bug bounty payout for XSS vulnerabilities. 

Samsung smart Fridge vulnerability can expose Gmail Credentials, says experts

(PC- google images)
A recent update by a team of security researchers have identified potential threat to gmail credentials via the Samsung Smart Fridge.

A ‘Man in The Middle’ (MiTM) vulnerability was discovered during an IoT(Internet of Things) hacking challenge in a recent DEF CON conference. Samsung’s RF28HMELBSR smart fridge was targeted for the confirmation of the potential credential breach to gmail accounts. The fridge implemented SSL, it faces trouble in validating SSL certificates thus giving rise to MiTM vulnerabilities.

The Internet connected device has the ability to automatically download the Google calendar to an on-screen interface and the MiTM vulnerability facilitates the hacker to jump into the same network and steal gmail credentials of its neighbours.

Ken Munro, a security researcher at Pen Test Partners stated that "The internet-connected fridge is designed to display Gmail Calendar information on its display," and thus "It appears to work the same way that any device running a Gmail calendar does. A logged-in user/owner of the calendar makes updates and those changes are then seen on any device that a user can view the calendar on" he added.

"While SSL is in place, the fridge fails to validate the certificate. Hence, hackers who manage to access the network that the fridge is on (perhaps through a de-authentication and fake Wi-Fi access point attack) can Man-In-The-Middle the fridge calendar client and steal Google login credentials from their neighbours, for example."

While the research team failed to breach the software update server and the fridge terminal at DEF CON hacking spree, the mobile app had shown glitches that have potential security problems.

(pc- google images)
The coding in the mobile app contains a certificate that enables the encryption of credentials between the fridge and the mobile app. The certificate is correctly passworded, but the credential to the certificate appeared to be stored in the mobile app in an obfuscated form. So, if the codes of the certificates are broken down, it will allow the hacker to send commands to the fridge.

Pedro Venda of Pen Test Partners remarked “We wanted to pull the terminal unit out of the fridge to get physical access to things like a USB port and serial or JTAG interfaces, but ran out of time. However, we still found some interesting bugs that definitely merit further investigation. The MiTM alone is enough to expose a user’s Gmail creds."

This fiasco has created a tensed atmosphere in the Samsung Headquarters. In an open statement, the company ensured that "At Samsung, we understand that our success depends on consumers’ trust in us, and the products and services that we provide. We are investigating into this matter as quickly as possible. Protecting our consumers’ privacy is our top priority, and we work hard every day to safeguard our valued Samsung users.”

Developer finds unpatched exploit in OS X 10.10.5

Luca Todesco, a developer, has found a loophole in the OS X 10.10.5 update released by Apple that can get a hacker root access of a Mac computer.

Todesco shared the information on Github and the loophole works on all versions of OS X Yosemite.

The developer did not give Apple a heads up before putting the information out on the internet and so Apple will not be immediately able to patch the vulnerability found by Todesco.

The vulnerability found by the developer is similar to the DYLD_PRINT_TO_ACCESS vulnerability which took Apple less than a month to fix.

Until the update comes out, Apple users can protect themselves by only downloading apps from the Apple Store and trusted developers.

Bug allows Hackers to open locked Biometric Fingerprint Doors

Researcher has uncovered various flaws in a Taiwan-based Chiyu Technology's fingerprint access controller which could allow hackers to easily open the locked doors.

The researcher, Maxim Rupp has said that the vulnerabilities allow the attacker to view and modify the existing configuration of the device without authentication by directly accessing known paths. 

The path (CVE-2015-2871) varies slightly depending on model and services available.

According to an advisory published on July 31, the paths for accessing communications, fingerprint and other setup pages vary depending on the model and the services that are available, CERT/CC.

“It has identified models BF-660C, BF-630, BF-630W as being vulnerable; other models may also be vulnerable. The CERT/CC has been unable to verify this information with the vendor. The CVSS score below is based on CVE-2015-2871,” the advisory read.

According to a story published in SecurityWeek, the researcher said that by gaining access to the controller’s fingerprint setup page, an attacker could modify settings, such as “security level” and “sensitivity,” to make it easier to open the door protected by the device. An attacker can also change the device’s network settings and disconnect it from the targeted organization’s network.

“The researcher has also found that some of the vulnerable biometric devices are accessible via the Internet, which allows an attacker to exploit the weakness remotely. An attacker might be able to carry out other actions as well once he gains access to the controller’s configuration pages, but the expert says he hasn’t conducted further tests,” the report read.

The researcher said that there were several other companies that which sold the same devices under a different brand.

The flaws were reported by the researcher to Chiyu Technology via CERT/CC on May 29. CERT/CC. However, the company concerned has not managed to get in touch with the manufacturer.

It is still unclear that when the company will fix the flaws in the fingerprint access controller.

Attackers can crash Your Android Device, says Trend Micro

Researchers from TrendLabs Security Intelligence have discovered a vulnerability in Android 4.3 (Jelly Bean) up to the current version, Android 5.1.1 (Lollipop) that could help an attacker to turn a phone “dead silent, unable to make calls, with a lifeless screen”.

Researchers have said that the flaw would cause phones to have no ring, text or notification sounds and be unable to make calls.

According to a post in its blog, “This vulnerability can be exploited in two ways: either via a malicious app installed on the device, or through a specially-crafted web site. The first technique can cause long-term effects to the device: an app with an embedded MKV file that registers itself to auto-start whenever the device boots would case the OS to crash every time it is turned on.”

The researchers said that the vulnerability was similar to the recently discovered Stagefright vulnerability. Both vulnerabilities were triggered when Android handles media files, although the way these files reached the user differs.

Researchers from Zimperium Mobile Security, a security firm, had discovered Stagefright in Android mobile operating system which they said to be the “worst Android vulnerabilities” to the date.

Though, the Google had patched the problem, millions of devices need to be updated. The flaw has affected nearly a billion devices.

 “The vulnerability lies in the mediaserver service, which is used by Android to index media files that are located on the Android device,” said the company. “The vulnerability is caused by an integer overflow when the mediaserver service parses an MKV file. It reads memory out of buffer or writes data to NULL address when parsing audio data,” the blog post read.

Although, the flaw was reported to the Google in May, the company concerned has been able to fix the issue.

Valve fixes a bug which allowed hackers to access its users account

Valve’s Steam, an American video game development and digital distribution company headquartered in Bellevue, Washington, United States which has millions of accounts all over the world, has fixed a loophole which could allow an attacker easily take over an arbitrary account by using account's username.

According to a report published in Master Herald, a flaw in the Steam’s password recovery feature was the reason behind the exploitation. As per a demonstration in a video posted on YouTube, the feature sends a recovery code to the registered e-mail address linked with the account. The code needs to be entered on a form through the Steam website.

However, the attacker could skip that code entry step, leaving the recovery code area blank, and have full access to the password change dialog. Although, the company has fixed the loophole, the vulnerability had done a lot of damages many users’ account.

“Now, the users, who actively trade on the Steam Market, are worried as they think their accounts have been compromised.

However, it is said that the Valve hasn’t commented on the situation yet.

The company has urged its users to keep an eye on their e-mail accounts. If an e-mail related to password recovery is received, the user should definitely not ignore it, and proceed to verify that their account is still accessible.

It is important to note that the information contained in the e-mail itself is not necessary to carry out the attack.

“Receiving this e-mail is simply a sign that the user is being targeted with the attack. However, some have reported that even changing their password has been ineffective, as the hackers are able to simply keep resetting it over and over again, and there was no good way to stop them,” the report added.

Your life is in the hands of the hackers, they can remotely hijack your Jeep

Image Credits: Wired
When we think of a term ‘hacking’, computers, bank accounts and websites are the things which come in our mind. One can barely think of hacked vehicles. However, a recent case in which a car was hijacked by hackers has shown that the hackers have left nothing safe in our life.

According to a report published on Wired, zero-day exploit for Chrysler vehicles allow hackers to control everything from the engine to the air-conditioning over the Internet, overriding the driver at the dashboard.

It has been found out that the Uconnect software, which manages the vehicle’s entertainment and navigation systems, provides a Wi-Fi hotspot, and allows drivers to make phone calls. It is said that if anyone who knows the car's IP address can hijack the car.

In the report, Andy Greenberg, senior writer, explained that he signed up to be a guinea pig for security researchers Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek. He was strapped into a Jeep and directed to head onto the highway. From 10 miles away, Miller and Valasek proceeded to hack into his car's software, toggling the windshield wipers, blasting the radio, and, eventually, cutting the transmission.

“Immediately my accelerator stopped working. As I frantically pressed the pedal and watched the RPMs climb, the Jeep lost half its speed, then slowed to a crawl. This occurred just as I reached a long overpass, with no shoulder to offer an escape. The experiment had ceased to be fun,” Greenberg said.

After that, the hackers successfully took over the jeep’s brakes as a result it went into a ditch.

“Miller and Valasek’s full arsenal includes functions that at lower speeds fully kill the engine, abruptly engage the brakes, or disable them altogether. The most disturbing maneuver came when they cut the Jeep’s brakes, leaving me frantically pumping the pedal as the 2-ton SUV slid uncontrollably into a ditch. The researchers say they’re working on perfecting their steering control—for now they can only hijack the wheel when the Jeep is in reverse. Their hack enables surveillance too: They can track a targeted Jeep’s GPS coordinates, measure its speed, and even drop pins on a map to trace its route,” he explained.

According to the news report, on Tuesday Senators Ed Markey (D-Massachusetts) and Richard Blumenthal (D-Connecticut) announced legislation that would ensure automobile companies to meet privacy measures to protect against cyber attacks.

In order to prevent the car hacking, Miller and Valasek reported about the flaw in the vehicles to the company concerned, months ago.

The Chrysler has come up with an updated version of the software however, the company has to manually download it and upgrade their cars through a USB drive.

United Airlines awards hackers millions of miles for reporting bugs

United Airlines  has awarded “millions of frequent flier miles” to hackers who have found out gaps in the carrier's web security, in a first for the U.S. airline industry, according to a report published on Reuters.

However, some tweets from those hackers have said that they have got small awards than the company had announced.  

“Well that answers that question. Found out which of my two bugs was worth a million because the other is apparently worth 250k,” one of the tweets posted by Jordan Wiens @psifertex.

It is also said that some terms of the agreement does not allow Wiens from disclosing the bug he had discovered.

On the other hand, the company concerned confirmed with Reuters that it has paid out two awards worth 1 million miles each, worth dozens of free domestic flights on the airline.

 "We believe that this program will further bolster our security and allow us to continue to provide excellent service," the United said on its website.

“It has hoped to trailblaze in the area of airline web security by offering "bug bounties" for uncovering cyber risks. Through the program, researchers flag problems before malicious hackers can exploit them. The cost can be less than hiring outside consultancies,” the news report read.

The Trade group Airlines for America said in a statement that all the United State carriers should conduct tests to make sure, if their systems are secure.

Beyond the Bug bounty program, the company also has tested systems internally and engaged cyber security firms to keep its websites secure.

Software bug affects cars, opens doors without warning

A software bug has been discovered by Land Rover in two of its cars. The issue is about a bug in the system that can unlock the doors of the car without warning to the driver.

The company will recall vehicles and do the necessary repairs without any charge to the customers.

The bug affects two models of Land Rover, the Range Rover and Range Rover Sport. 65,000 vehicles have been recalled due to this.

The company has placed ads in newspapers and is contacting the owners to call them in for the recall.

Disable Java in your browsers, if installed as researchers spotted new Java based Zero-day Exploit

Researchers from Trend Micro have found out suspicious URLs that hosted a newly discovered Zero-day exploit, which refers to a hole in software that is exploited by hackers before the vendor becomes aware of it, in Java.

Brooks Li, a threat analyst and Feike Hacquebord, a senior threat researcher, who spotted this exploit, said that this was the first time in nearly two years that a new Java zero-day vulnerability was reported.

The researchers came to know about this exploit after receiving a feedback in their  Smart Protection Network.

According to the report, this new zero-day Java Exploit is being used in spear-phishing attacks targeting a certain forces of NATO country and a US Defence Organization
This zero-day bug affects only the latest Java version not the older versions, Java 1.6 and 1.7.
The vulnerability is still not patched by the company concerned.

According to the report, the URLs hosting the new Java zero-day exploit are similar to the URLs seen in the attack launched by the threat actors behind Pawn Storm that targeted North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) members and White House last April 2015.

The researchers have asked the users to disable Java in browsers if installed due to an application.

Update Your Flash Player or Remove from Plugins

(PC- Google images)
Adobe has issued another update for Flash Player to patch a critical vulnerability which has been revealed in documents disclosed from the spyware maker Hacking Team.

The Adobe Flash update patches 36-CVE listed flaws including the Hacking Team’s CVE-2015-5119 bug in which a malicious flash file, can run malware on a user’s computer. The other 35 security flaws allow hackers to create remote-coded execution attacks on vulnerable computers.

Users of Windows, Linux, and OS X were advised to updated to the latest version of Adobe Flash. The update is considered essential for both OS X and Windows users.

The alternative to this is uninstalling Adobe Flash or disabling the plugin. You can also set your web browser to run Flash files only if you right-click on them and select “run this plugin.”

“Adobe has released security updates for Adobe Flash Player for Windows, Macintosh and Linux. These update address critical vulnerabilities that could potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system. Adobe is aware of a report that an exploit targeting CVE-2015-5119 has been publicly published”, Adobe quoted in its security Bulletin.

Adobe’s Security Bulletin gives the security updates for the Adobe Flash Player.