Researchers claim hack of Israeli military network

Blue Coat Systems Inc, a network solution provider based in California, has claimed that they have detected a hack in Israel's military network.

According to them, the hack seems to be a four month job and is an espionage campaign that skillfully packages existing attack software with trick emails.

The hack seems to be a job of Arabic-speakimg hackers as researchers at Blue Coat have found that programming tools used to hack the network had a default Arabic setting. They suspect the hackers might be working on a small budget as most of their code has been sourced from previous existing versions of hacking software.

Israeli defense minstry spokerperson said that Military officials were "not aware of hacking on IDF operational networks."

"Not all targeted attackers need advanced tools," Blue Coat wrote in a draft paper shared with Reuters. "As regional conflicts continue, cyber threats from groups of various skill levels will also accompany the conventional armed conflicts."

International operation mounted to counter Beebone Botnet

A multinational task-force comprising of European Cybercrime Centre (EC3) and the Joint Cybercrime Action Taskforce (J-CAT), the FBI and led by Dutch National High Tech Crime Unit was recently set up to target the Beebone (AAEH) botnet, a downloader virus that cripples a computers defenses by downloading various malwares on a PC.

Private players Intel Security, Kaspersky and Shadowserver were also present to consult on destroying the polymorphic downloader that according to sources, has affected 12000 computers till date.

The operation 'sinkholed' the botnet by recognizing the domain names and addresses of the affected parties and then rerouting traffic.

Emergency teams around the world have been put into motion to get into touch with the victims of the botnet. The number of affected parties is less in this case, but the botnet has been deemed to be very sophisticated.

The operation was successfully carried out after which Europol’s Deputy Director of Operations, Wil van Gemert, said "This successful operation shows the importance of international law enforcement working together with private industry to fight the global threat of cybercrime."

"We will continue our efforts to take down botnets and disrupt the core infrastructures used by cybercriminals to carry out a variety of crimes. Together with the EU Member States and partners around the globe, our aim is to protect people worldwide against these criminal activities."

Passwords stolen for Windows users of Puush


Over this weekend, the screenshot sharing app, Puush server was hacked and a malware infected program was placed as an update for Windows users.

The software version r94 downloads malware, which  grab passwords from infected systems. The update has been taken offline, and the latest update r100  is available as download, which will tell you if you were infected or not, this update will clean the malware.

The company noted that the Windows version of the app was affected, the iOS and OS X versions apps are safe.

According to statement released by company, "The malware may be collecting locally stored passwords, but we are yet to confirm these have been transmitted back to a remote location. We have been running the malware in sandboxed environments and have not been able to reproduce any such behaviour. Even so, we recommend you change any important passwords which were stored on your PC (unless they were in a secure password manager). This includes chrome/firefox saved passwords."

The company made removal and cleanup tool available for users, who may have been put off using Puush.

“We have created a cleaner for people who do not wish to continue using puush. It is stand-alone and will tell you if you were infected (assuming you have not already updated to r100).”

 You can obtain this here: http://puush.me/dl/puush_is_sorry.exe.

Google intrduces new review process for apps, age based rating system for all apps on Play Store soon


Google has decided to make change to its app submission process by adding human approval as a new step. Starting a couple of months back, a team of reviewers at Google started reviewing all applications before they were allowed to go live on the Play Store.

“We started reviewing all apps and games before they’re published – it’s rolled out 100%, and developers haven’t noticed the change.” said Purnima Kochikar, Director of Business Development for Google Play. After implementing the new review system, Google has still maintained its superiority in speed over rivals, Apple. Developers are able to get their apps live within a few hours of its submission on the Play Store, unlike Apple which has lengthy review process.

The reason Google has been so successful at this is its autmoated software that can detect only malware, but also sexual content and infringement of copyrights. Kochikar was not very coclusive about what all Google can detect through its automated detection softwares.

She said, “We’re constantly trying to figure out how machines can learn more,” explains Kochikar. “So whatever the machines can catch today, the machines do. And whatever we need humans to weigh in on, humans do.”

Google also lauched a new age based rating system for the Play Store that is supposed to come into effect in May. The system will be based on the scales provided by a given region’s official rating authourity. App developers will be required to fill in a questionnaire about the objectionable content in their app before submission and return the most appropriate rating for the app.

Googel has said that it will keep an eye on the ratings being given out by the new questionnaire system to make sure that the developers are truthful while filling out the questionnaire. Their will be a grace period for applications which are currently their on the Play Store, but soon, new submissions and updates to the Play Store will require developers to fill out the questionnaire.

Uber files John Doe lawsuit in response to nine month-old data breach


Uber has filed a John Doe lawsuit in the district court of Northern California as part of its investigation regarding a data breach of one its driver’s database.

Last year in on September 17th, Uber discovered that one of its databases had been accessed using a login key that was posted on a post on Github.  The key was used to access Uber's internal database which houses information about 50,000 drivers.

Uber has begun reaching out to drivers whose information was stored in the breached database. The company has also provided a one year free membership of Experian’s ProtectMyID Alert to drivers whose information has been stolen.

Uber has also subpoenaed Github to share the IP addresses of anyone who visited a particular gist post (the login key used to access the database was posted there) between March and September 2014.

Uber shared the information about the breach through a post on its blog, on which it mentioned that the breach of data had occurred sometime around 12th May, last year. The files that were stolen from the database contained names and driving license numbers of its drivers, past and present. According to Uber, no case of misuse of any stolen data has been reported.

Questions have risen after the post was published on Uber's blog as to why the company did not come forward with the information earlier, and why were driver partners whose information was stolen and put at risk, not informed about the incident earlier?

Apple releases Bash update addressing ShellShock vulnerability

Over the last few days we have seen headlines about the critical security bug in Bash shell that affects Unix, Linux and even Mac computers.

Apple previously noted that only few Mac users who runs the advanced Unix Services were actually affected by the shell shock vulnerability.  Others are not at risk to this bug.

Apple said they are working to quickly provide update to patch this problem.

As promoised, it has released OS X bash update for OS X Lion, Mountain Lion and Mavericks.

You can download the update from their support page:
http://support.apple.com/downloads/