Thousands Of Users Thrashed By Extremely Real-looking-Fake-Scans Scam



Thousands of users have encountered a severe threat from scammers who are employing cunning use of JavaScript and HTML codes by way of “Potentially Unwanted Applications”.

A major security researching organization uncovered a recent development in the scamming area where PUAs and POAs are being employed.

These scams could be categorized as tech-support scams which primarily work on scaring the victim into doing something unforeseen by the victim themselves.

After fake-calls, potentially unwanted applications have become quite common, but the latest twist is the shrewd usage of JavaScript and HTML code.

These codes specifically work on making the fake scans seem implausibly real, making it faster and easier for the scanners to fool their prey.

The well-known Norton Security applications are basically being stolen from the aforementioned organization.

These scams are in no way comparable to the basic and obvious anti-virus scams that are run on a common basis.

The scammers make the scan look so legit that it never occurs to the victim to question it at all.

There sure is an alert which pops up. The users think of it to be as one from an anti-malware app, when it’s actually coming from a web browser.

The way the scanners go around is that they offer an infection to be paired up by way of a 10-second scan. This obviously lures the users in swiftly.

A web-based dashboard is being implemented by the scammers to manage and monitor all the scams that are happening.

Thousands of dollars have been wrested from the victims that too by using overtly basic, fake looking contrivances.

Last three months of 2018 had been really busy for Symantec, the aforementioned organization, as they’ve blocked PUA installations around 89 million times.

There are several points that have to be kept in mind, for instance, no pop up is capable of analyzing the hard drive and the real files on it.

No anti-malware supplication would ask the user to download a separate application for the update process.

The best way to get saved from this kind of threat is looking out for an alert that mentions the remaining days left in the so called “subscription”.

Scam Alert: Emails Citing You’ve Won A BMW M24oi







There is a fresh scam in the market. Beware of emails citing that you’ve won a BMW lottery and acquired a BMW 2 series M24oi in this holiday season. These scams as per usual are after your personal data and credentials.


What seems to be like a whole new scamming campaign is actually trying to lure users into believing that they have won a lottery and as the prize they have won a BMW 2 series M24oi.


According to a reputed source the e-mails could have phrases and sentences like, “Hurry claim the prize” or “Claim your car and check with your winning code.” The contents of the e-mail are as follows:-

“Your e-mail has been selected for a prize of a brand new 2018 BMW 2 Series M24oi xDrive and a cheque of $1,500,000.00 USD from the international balloting programs held in USA but the WINNING IS FOR EVERYBODY CONTACTED AS A WINNER IN ANY PART OF THE WORLD. Contact the claims agents with the code BMW:2541256004/25 and your Delivery Details (full name, address of delivery and mobile number) to claim your prize.
 Congratulations!!!!
This message has been scanned for viruses and dangerous content by MailScanner, and is believed to be clean.”


The moment the receiver falls into the trap by sending the attacker their information, the cyber-con behind the scam is quite likely to as for more information including social security numbers and other sort of confidential information.


Later, the harvested information would be used to operate an identity theft in order to attain access to the receiver’s financial as well as personal accounts.


The only way to save your own self from falling into the entrapment of such scams is to delete the e-mails as soon as they are received. Or you might end up paying heavily.



21-Year-Old Arrested For SIM Swapping Hack; Allegedly Steals $1 Million


U.S. broadsheet the New York Post announced Nov. 20 regarding some authorities in the United State, state of California who have arrested a 21-year old New Yorker for the supposed burglary of $1 million in crypto utilizing "SIM-swapping,"

SIM-swapping otherwise called a "port-out scam" includes the burglary of a mobile phone number with the end goal to capture online financial and social media accounts, empowered by the way that numerous organizations utilize computerized messages or telephone calls to deal with client validation.

The captured suspect, Nicholas Truglia, is accused for having focused on well off Silicon Valley officials in the Bay Area, and of effectively convincing telecoms support staff to port six exploited people's numbers to his an affirmed "crew" of accomplice attackers. Deputy DA Erin West, of Santa Clara Superior Court, told the Post that the ploy was "a new way of doing an old crime.”

“You’re sitting in your home, your phone is in front of you, and you suddenly become aware there is no service because the bad guy has taken control of your phone number,” West said.

With his capture on November 14, authorities were able to recover $300,000 in stolen reserves while the remaining assets remain untraced.

Trugila is currently being held at pending for extradition to Santa Clara, where he faces 21 felony counts related with an aggregate of six exploited people, authorities said. One of Truglia's supposed SIM-swapping victims, San Francisco-based Robert Ross, was purportedly robbed of $500,000 worth of crypto possessions on his Coinbase wallet "in a flash" on Oct. 26, and in the meantime a further $500,000 was taken from his Gemini account. West said the $1,000,000 was Ross' "life savings" and his two girls' college fund.

This rising predominance of SIM swap-related occurrences has therefore provoked a California-based law enforcement group to make it their "most noteworthy need." in excess of one prominent occasion, exploited people have acted to sue telecoms firms, for example, AT&T and T-Mobile for their help of the wrongdoing.

Truglia is since being held Manhattan Detaintion Complex pending extradition to Santa Clara in California. Formal charges identify with a seven-day "hacking spree" starting Oct. 8, particularly involving "grand theft, altering or damaging computer data with the intent to defraud and using personal information without authorization.”