No, Your fridge is not sending spam emails - They are innocent

A recent report from security firm Proofpoint saying "Internet connected Refrigerators are participating in massive cyber attack" is one of the hot topic on Information Security.

The report said that a massive global cyber attack involved more than 750k malicious emails relied on more than 100k consumer gadgets such as routers, multimedia systems, tvs and refrigerator.

However, a recent report form Symantec says "Internet of Things" devices including the Internet-connected fridge are not source of this spam campaign.

Symantec confirmed the source of spam as several windows-based computers, and none of them were originated from any non-windows based computer systems.

"if your refrigerator uses a feature known as port forwarding and someone contacts the IP address on port 80, that traffic is allowed to reach your smart refrigerator."Symantec report reads.


"Viewed from outside, all you will see is the refrigerator and you may not even realize there is a router with potentially many other devices behind it, such as an infected computer." Symantec experts explained that it might be the reason why researchers mistakenly considered the IoT devices as source for the spam campaign.

Even though the IoT devices such as fridge are innocent at this time, experts say that we can expect them to be exploited by cyber criminals in future.  Researchers also pointed out that there is already few malware targeting Linux-based IoT devices. 

Massive Cyber attack Shut down Knight Center's websites for Two weeks

The websites of the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas and the International Symposium for Online Journalism hit by massive cyber attack that left the sites down for last two weeks.

“The malicious cyber-attack was enough to shut our websites down, but not to enough to shut us up. We rapidly created WordPress blogs to continue our regular and unique report on Journalism in the Americas,” said professor Rosental Alves, founder and director of the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas at the University of Texas at Austin.

“We have no idea why someone would want to attack our sites"said professor Alves.

They noticed that the origin of the cyber-attack was in computers located in Russia.

According to the Knight center news report, the attack was taken place on March 11. Those affected websites are now back online.

"We had to shut down the sites, while the University of Texas IT department conduct its work to clean the sites and make sure increase its security levels.We are happy to be back with our normal presence on the Web,” said professor Alves.