Security Vulnerability in McDonald's India allows hackers to access Customer data

 
If you are from India and have ordered Burger in McDonald's, your personal details are at risk.

Security researchers from  Fallible found a serious vulnerability McDonald’s India application that allows hackers to access millions of customer data.

There is no authentication or authorization check in API used in the application.   Sending request to "http://services.mcdelivery.co.in/ProcessUser.svc/GetUserProfile" with customer id in the header allows to access customer details.

The customer id is a sequential number.  All an attacker needs to do is create a script and increase the number to dump all customer data.

"The lack of strong data protection and privacy laws or penalties in India, unlike the European Union , United States or Singapore has led to companies ignoring user data protection" The researcher said.

"We have in the past discovered more than 50 instances of data leaks in several Indian organizations." The researcher said.

The vulnerability allows attackers to obtain name, address, email address, phone number,  Date of birth, GPS Co-ordinates and social profile details.

The researchers reported the issue to McDelivery on 4th February, 2017.  After few days(13th Feb), they received an acknowledgement from the McDelivery IT Manager.  From 7th march,  Fallible tried to contact the McDelivery to know the status.  However, there is no response from their side.  The bug is still not fixed, at the time of writing.

In Jan 2017, a researcher Tijme Gommers found two critical bugs "an insecure cryptographic storage vulnerability" and XSS in McDonald.

Hackers could easily bypass SBI's OTP security

One Time Password (OTP) has become the new security feature on most of the websites, including the banks. This feature allows a user to make online transactions after the identity of the customer is verified by putting the OTP password sent to the registered mobile number from the bank. But who knew this security feature could be easily bypassed and lead to huge loss of money.

A white-hat hacker, bug bounty hunter and web application security researcher, Neeraj Edwards shared his research on how he could easily bypass the OTP of one of the most popular bank, State Bank of India (SBI) and could make the transaction with any amount.



While making a transaction, the last page of SBI’s website shows a One Time Password screen where there is a parameter called ‘smartotpflag is set to Y i.e. smartotpflag=Y’.


Smartotpflag parameter is used to generate OTP, and Y represents ‘yes’ to send the code to the registered mobile. However, the risk factor arises if someone changes ‘Y’ to ‘N’ which means ‘No’. The transaction then will be completed without entering the OTP.


Though after Edwards discovery, the vulnerability was patched but it was highly disappointing that the person who could have easily benefited from this vulnerability, but choose not to, was neither rewarded nor acknowledged for his work.

The press too could not make this important news to the papers, thus keeping the public in dark and keeping the discoverer from any achievement.

The POC Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2kYm1G2jBcM

IT security firm Trustwave sued for Failing to Stop Data Breach

IT security firm Trustwave has been accused of failing to properly investigate the card breach suffered by the Las Vegas-based casino operator Affinity Gaming in 2013.

Affinity Gaming filed a complaint in the district court of Nevada in December alleged Trustwave of misrepresenting themselves and failed to perform the adequate investigation, identify the breach, and falsely misinform them about the correction of the breach.

In December 2013, Affinity Gaming suffered a security breach that penetrated their payment card systems. They called Trustwave to investigate the matter.

According to the complaint filed “Trustwave informed the company that the malware was removed from its systems and that the breach was contained.”

After Trustwave completed its investigation, Affinity Gaming called Ernst & Young to conduct penetration testing. While penetration testing testers identified suspicious activity associated with a piece of malware.

Now Affinity Gaming  called FireEye-owned forensic specialist Mandiant  for further investigation.

The complaint was filed based on the latest investigation done by Mandiant.

“Trustwave had failed to diagnose that the data breach actually was the result of unidentified outside persons or organizations who were able to compromise Affinity’s data through Affinity Gaming’s Virtual Private Network (VPN), and that the ‘backdoor’ these persons/organizations had created — which Trustwave had speculated may have existed but concluded was ‘inert’ — was very real and accessible,” reads the complaint.

“Mandiant also determined that the unauthorized access and renewed data breach occurred on a continuous basis both before and after Trustwave claimed that the data breach had been contained,” it continues.

Affinity is looking for damages in excess of $100,000 / €92,000.

A trojan that evades security products and stole data

Spymel, a new Trojan discovered by Zscaler (a US-based cyber-security vendor), reaches computer through spam emails and remain undetected from security products.

This Trojan is attached to emails as an archive file. Once it is downloaded and decompressed, the archive file starts executing a JavaScript file that downloads and installs the actual malware executable, a .NET binary.
It is notion that the  archive file does not contain the malware, so the antivirus products fails to flag the danger. .Net binary is also not detected because of the  digital certificate that is issued by  SBO INVEST via DigiCert.

According to Zscaler  Spymel infections was  first detected in early December 2015. As soon as they informed the case to DigiCert and had the certificate revoked. But the group behind Spymel quickly updated their certificate
.
Spymel can act like a malware payload downloader , make screenshots of a user's desktop, record videos of the desktop, log keystrokes, and upload stolen data to a remote server.

Spymel is a perfect example of  malware, where malware can use archive files boobytrapped with JavaScript code and digital certificates to hide.

MagSpoof which costs $10 can steal your credit card number


Someone has made a device that costs $10 which could steal credit card information when anyone has lost his credit card and applied for a new card. And before he gets it, the device helps hacers to steal or at least guess the credit card number.

The device dubbed MagSpoof was made by Samy Kamkar. The device can predict and store hundreds of American Express credit card numbers, allowing anyone to use them for wireless payment transactions, even at non-wireless terminals.

According to the hackers, MagSpoof can spoof any magnetic stripe or credit card entirely wirelessly, it also disable chip and PIN (EMV) protection and accurately predict the card number and expiration date on American Express credit cards.

“MagSpoof can be used as a traditional credit card and simply store all of your credit cards (and with modification, can technically disable chip requirements) in various impressive and exciting form factors, or can be used for security research in any area that would traditionally require a magstripe, such as readers for credit cards, drivers licenses, hotel room keys, automated parking lot tickets, etc,” Kamkar said in a blog post.

MagSpoof emulates a magnetic stripe by quickly changing the polarization of an electromagnet, producing a magnetic field similar to that of a normal magnetic stripe as if it's being swiped. The magstripe reader requires no form of wireless receiver, NFC, or RFID. MagSpoof works wirelessly, even with standard magstripe readers. The stronger the electromagnet, the further away you can use it.

The device actually guesses the next credit card numbers and new expiration dates based on a cancelled credit card's number and when the replacement card was requested respectively. This process does not require the three or four-digit CVV numbers that are printed on the back side of the credit cards.


The hacker has notified American Express and said the company is fixing the flaw. 

FBI denies paying $1 million to attack Tor



FBI has refused an accusation of paying at least $1 million to Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) researchers to infiltrate Tor, a free software implementation of second-generation onion routing that enables its users to communicate anonymously on the internet.

The intelligence agency told Ars Technica, that these accusations of paying the security researchers of the university to disclose the Tor users as well as Reveal their IP addresses as part of a criminal investigation was 'inaccurate'.

"The allegation that we paid (Carnegie Mellon University) $1 million to hack into Tor is inaccurate," the FBI said.

However, the Tor Project team had discovered last year in July that more than hundred new Tor relays that modified Tor protocol headers to track people who were looking for Hidden Services, web servers hosted on Tor that offers more privacy.

The attackers used a combination of nodes and exit relays along with some vulnerabilities in the Tor network protocol that let them uncovered users' real IP addresses.

After discovering the flaws, the team updated its software and rolled out new versions of code to block similar attacks in the future. But, during that time the team could not find the hackers behind the flaws.

“We teach law enforcement agents that they can use Tor to do their investigations ethically, and we support such use of Tor -- but the mere veneer of a law enforcement investigation cannot justify wholesale invasion of people's privacy, and certainly cannot give it the color of "legitimate research," the Tor team said in a blog post.

"Whatever academic security research should be in the 21st century, it certainly does not include "experiments" for pay that indiscriminately endanger strangers without their knowledge or consent," the post added.


Now, the Tor claims to have patched the vulnerabilities but this doesn't solve the core problem.