Cisco releases software updates to address serious flaws in TelePresence products

Cisco has released software updates to address several vulnerabilities that have been identified in its TelePresence products, which can be exploited by hackers to compromise a vulnerable system.

It has also urged its customers to update their TelePresence software. Similarly, they are advised to consult their maintenance providers or check the software for feature set compatibility and known issues that are specific to their environments.

Cisco said in an advisory published on May 13 that the workarounds that mitigate the vulnerabilities, which have been identified by during its internal tests and product security reviews, are not available.

“The vulnerability in the web framework of multiple Cisco TelePresence products could allow an authenticated or remote attacker to inject arbitrary commands that are executed with the privileges of the root user,” Cisco said in its advisory.

“The vulnerability is due to insufficient input validation. An attacker could exploit this vulnerability by authenticating to the device and submitting crafted input to the affected parameter in a web page."

"Administrative privileges are required in order to access the affected parameter. A successful exploit could allow an attacker to execute system commands with the privileges of the root user,” the advisory added.

Cisco said that although, this is a serious vulnerability with a CVSS score of 9.0, it hasn’t found evidence that shows flaw has been leveraged for malicious purposes.

One click scammers targeting people in Hong Kong

People running one click scams on the internet have seem to taken it one step further by creating new malware in Chinese.

Recently, one click scammers have begun targeting people in Hong Kong by using pop-up windows and registration pages that have been written in Chinese and ask for payment in Hong Kong dollars. In the last month alone, Symantec has blocked more than 8,000 such attempts.

Such scams have been primarily running on adult websites and download malicious software to a users computer.

Such scams primarily were run in Japan but hackers have come into new territory by learning Chinese.

Cisco fixes remote code flaw in its UCS Central software

Cisco System Inc, an American multinational corporation,  has released an advisory to address remote code execution vulnerability in its Unified Computing System (UCS) Central software, a networking giant which integrates processing, networking and storage into one system.


The company said that it could exploit by remote attackers to execute arbitrary commands on affected systems.

“Successful exploitation of the vulnerability may permit unauthenticated access to sensitive information, allow arbitrary command execution on the Cisco UCS Central operating system or impact the availability of the affected device,” Cisco wrote in its advisory on May 6.

“An attacker could exploit this vulnerability by sending a crafted HTTP request to an affected device," said the advisory. An exploit could allow the attacker to execute arbitrary commands on the underlying operating system with the privileges of the root user.”

According to the advisory, the vulnerability was caused by the improper input validation (CVE-2015-0701) which allows an unauthenticated remote attacker to execute arbitrary commands on the underlying operating system with root privileges.

However, the company has failed to validate user input via its web framework, exposing the platform to remote attack in versions 1.2.

The company added that it is not aware of any public exploits as it hasn’t found any evidence to prove it.

The advisory said that the users can fix the vulnerability by updating the software which is provided by Cisco.

The company has urged its users to update to UCS Central software version 1.3. It has assigned the vulnerability its highest severity score of 10.

Earlier, Cisco released security updates for several of its products. Like Cisco Adaptive Security Appliance (ASA), Cisco Small Business SPA300 and SPA500 series IP phones, and IOS software.

Hacker's tweet led FBI to issue warning for airlines in US

In response to the claims and reports of the recent United Airlines incident, The US Federal Bureau of Investigation has issued a warning to all the airlines to be on the lookout for hackers. It follows an onboard tweet from Chris Roberts, pro hacker and the founder of One World Labs.

Roberts, a researcher specializing in the security of commercial airplanes, was detained by FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation) agents while deplaning his United Airlines flight from Denver to Syracuse, New York. This action was taken after he tweeted a joke about taking control of the plane’s engine-indicating and crew-alerting system, which provides flight crews with information in real-time about an aircraft’s functions, including temperatures of various equipment, fuel flow and quantity, and oil-pressure.

The computer expert tweeted: “Find myself on a 737/800, lets see Box-IFE-ICE-SATCOM, ? Shall we start playing with EICAS messages? 'PASS OXYGEN ON' Anyone ? :)”. This apparently caught the attention of Federal authorities who confiscated Robert’s iPad, MacBook Pro, and storage devices after questioning him for four hours.


Roberts stated that he was perturbed by the actions of the US law enforcement as he has been demonstrating vulnerabilities in the avionics system used on modern airplanes and telling CNN that he could connect a computer under his seat to view data from the aircraft’s engines, fuel and flight-management systems. And he is not the only one, according to an article by Forbes, Thomas Lim, head of security consultancy Cose Inc, has repeatedly been checked going through airports in recent years. On a flight from New York to Taipei, he was searched of all his belongings at the airport in Anchorage.

United Airlines has now banned Chris Roberts from all its flights.

Moreover, in a notification reported by the Wired Magazine, the FBI advised airlines to report any suspicious activity i.e. passengers connecting unknown wires and cables, or tampering or the forced removal of covers to network connection ports, along with reporting any evidence of suspicious behaviour concerning aviation wireless signals, including social media messages with threatening references to onboard network systems, automatic dependent surveillance systems (ADS-B), aircraft communications addressing and reporting systems (ACARS) and air traffic control networks.

Valve new policy to control spam cases and phishing on Steam


Photo Courtesy: Steam
With an aim to control spam cases and phishing on Steam, Valve, an entertainment software and technology company, has come up with a new policy under which people won’t get Steam’s features, unless they have a minimum of $5 worth of games in their library, or more in the store.

It is believed that Valve’s new policy is to ensure that the user is an actual gamer or not.

It is said that once the new policy gets implemented, current and new users will find huge restriction on their Steam accounts. However, those people who have spent $5 in the past or more in the store won’t have to face such restriction.

Although, people can play games without paying $5, they cannot send friend invitations, open a group chat, vote on Greenlight, Steam Reviews and Workshop items, participate in the Steam Market, post frequently in the Steam Discussions, gain Steam Profile Levels (Locked to level 0) and Trading Cards, submit content on the Steam Workshop, post in an item's Steam Workshop Discussions, access the Steam Web API, use browser and mobile chat.

Tom Sykes, who writes for PC Gamer, wrote that if anyone has 200 Steam games on his/her game library, then he/she won’t face restrictions. But, the new policy would affect people who only use Steam with disc-based retail games.

He added that by activating retail game on Steam won't prevent account restrictions. People can use buy different features by their own currency. Their currency will be converted into dollars using daily exchange rates.

Teenagers suspected of hacking Belgian and French websites


Photo Courtesy: The Local France
Two teenagers, who were suspected of hacking the websites of Belgian and French newspapers last week, would have a court hearing, authorities said on April 17.

The websites of Le Soir, La Libre Belgique, La Dernière Heure, the Sudpresse group, the French regional publications, including La Voix du Nord, and Union de Reims and l'Ardennais, which sites were disabled during the attacks, were targeted.

According to the prosecutors, five-year prison sentence will be given to those two teens, if the prosecutors find them guilty. Similarly, those persons will have to pay a fine of up to 100,000 euros and also to have to compensate for the damages.


In a statement Brussels prosecutors said that the regional unit of computer crime managed to identify the two teens, who are 18 and 16 years old, behind the cyber attacks on Sunday and Monday.

The hacking, which took place on Sunday evening, forced the Le Soir to close down its website for several hours.

The Belgian media group Rossel and the Belgian group IMP filed a police complaint last week.

The authorities carried out three raids in Belgium. During the raids, they discovered one address which linked to the attacks.

An examining magistrate has been investigating the case. They will try to find out, if others are involved or not in the attacks, the authorities said.

In a video by an anonymous group of Belgian, said that it had identified one of the teens as an adolescent who lives in Belgium and loves playing games.

The group, which is said to be hackers’ group, said it shared information with the police as it was protecting freedom of expression.