Negligence of Experian puts T mobile’s 15 million records at stake

Third biggest mobile company in U.S, T mobile’s CEO, John Legere is angry again and for a very obvious reason as this time highly personal records of some 15 million users have been leaked through one of the largest credit agency data brokers in the world, Experian.

The information exposed names, addresses, and social security, driver’s license and passport numbers of the customers. The license and passport numbers were in an encrypted field, but Experian said that encryption may also have been compromised.

The massive security breach was first discovered on September 15, 2015 which impacted customers who registered for T mobile between September 01, 2013 and September 16, 2015.

Legere broke the sad news in a post on the company's website which displayed his frustration over the incident.

The post read as below:
“Obviously I am incredibly angry about this data breach and we will institute a thorough review of our relationship with Experian."

Experian took immediate action upon finding the breach. It secured the server, initiated a comprehensive investigation and notified U.S. and international law enforcement.

In the most obvious manner in which the companies react on their security being breached; Experian too is offering those impacted by the break-in two years of free credit monitoring and identity theft resolution services.

There have been a series of high-profile hacks of businesses and other organisations in recent years impacting millions and sometimes tens of millions of records, including adultery website Ashley Madison, Sony Pictures, and retailers such as Home Depot, Target, and eBay.

Theft of personnel records from the U.S. government this year, a 2014 breach on JPMorgan Chase and a 2013 attack on Target Corp's cash register systems were also some of them.

The irony is that a company which handles the personal information of many Americans had not been able to protect the information of customers who applied for T mobile services.
It is the second massive breach linked to Experian.

An attack on the company's subsidiary happened in 2012 which exposed the Social Security numbers of 200 million Americans and prompted an investigation by at least four states, including Connecticut.
Though the security breach will adversely affect both the companies but T Mobile is trying to put all the blame on Experian.
In one o it’s FAQ , it read-

“Experian has taken full responsibility for the theft of data from its server.”
Both the companies had made it clear that no credit card or banking data was exposed. Yet, the hoard of T-Mobile customer data can still be used for assembling profiles for identity theft.

If consumers can’t pressure data aggregators like Experian into securing their secrets, perhaps the consumer-facing companies who collect that information can.
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