Beware of emails with resume attachments as Phishers still use JavaScript attachments


Beware of emails with an attached resume from a job applicant because some of the hackers are still using old JavaScript attachments to deliver the CryptoWall which could leave people in great trouble.

In an article by Brian Bebeau posted on SpiderLabs Blog (Trustwave SEG Cloud), mentioned that recently, it was noticed that a spam run of emails which contained an attached resume from a job applicant. The attachment, with a file extension ‘.js’, was in plain-text and consisted of JavaScript.

After some days, the next spam was noticed which looked more serious and zipped the attachment. The hackers tried to give the attachment a MIME type of "image/png" in order to appear it as an image among the people.

If anyone retrieves the picture, it will turn out to be a Windows executable.

Bebeau wrote that after analysing the file, they came to know that this is a Cryptowall ransomware variant. So, if anyone opens the attachment to look a resume or picture, he/she could end up with his/her entire system in trouble.

He added that some group of spammers also uses JavaScript to hide their phishing attachments. Instead of a resume, they used that old standby, the common account phish.

Bebeau wrote that people can verify an email by looking at the header addresses, before opening the attachments.

Subject lines include:

- Un-authorized User
- Verification Required
- Must verify your account
- Validate account

He said that it is said that people’s account has been limited or disabled, and that to restore their account, they must follow some steps in the attachment.

Now, the attachment is an HTML file with a JavaScript section which instructs people to turn on JavaScript. If they view the attachment in a JavaScript-enabled browser, it creates a form which asks for their personal information.

The form asks for peoples’ social security number and their credit card number along with their name and address. And if anyone fills it and clicks submit button, his/her all data goes to a server in Russia.

According to Bebeau, if people can examine an attachment carefully, it can be a useful to pull JavaScript code for content blocking.

He wrote that, Trustwave SEG Cloud, blocked around 200 of these phishing messages within three days. People should not turn on JavaScript even if some email asks them to do so.
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