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BadOnions : Bad TOR exit nodes attempts to login with sniffed password


A security researcher spent a month to find bad TOR exit nodes by setting up a honeypot kind of website which has a fake login page - To find the nodes that sniffs the traffic and attempts to steal the password.

Tor protects its users by bouncing their communications around a distributed network of relays runs by volunteers all around the world.

Chloe wrote in a blog, “A few weeks ago I got the idea of testing how much sniffing is going on in the Tor network by setting up a phishing site where I login with unique password and then store them. I do this with every exit node there is and then see if a password has been used twice, if that's the case I know which node that was sniffing the traffic.”

According to the researcher, he bought a domain with a tempting name (such as bitcoinbuy) and then created a sub-domain(admin.) by using vhost and set up a simple login.

He used a simple login script that allowed any password ending wiht "sbtc".  He created a random password ending with "sbtc" (eg:d25799f05fsbtc) and used it via tor nodes.

The script also saves the login attempts and successful logins in a file with user agent, IP and time - This will help him to find the bad nodes.

“The results are not so surprising, but what is most surprising about this is that 2 nodes with the 'guard' flag had logged in twice. Also, none of these nodes has been flagged even though I reported them to Tor.” Researcher said in his blog.
He released the result of the test; He tested more than 130k Exit nodes within 32 days. He found that there were 12 failed-login attempts, 16 successful logins that had not come from the researcher.

Cisco announces its intent to acquire OpenDNS

 
Cisco announced on June 30 its intent to acquire OpenDNS, a security company which provides advanced threat protection for any device, anywhere and anytime based in San Francisco.

It is said that the acquisition will boost Cisco's Security everywhere approach by adding broad visibility and threat intelligence from the OpenDNS cloud delivered platform.

According to the press statement issued by the organization, the OpenDNS team will join the Cisco Security Business Group. As per the agreement, Cisco will pay $635 million in cash and assumed equity awards, plus retention based incentives for OpenDNS. The acquisition is expected to close in the first quarter of fiscal year 2016, subject to customary closing conditions.

The press statement said that the burgeoning digital economy and the Internet of Everything (IoE) are expected to spur the connection of nearly 50 billion devices by 2020, creating a vast new wave of opportunities for security breaches across networks. The faster customers can deploy a solution, the faster they can detect, block and remediate these emerging security threats.

“OpenDNS' cloud platform offers security delivered in a Software-as-a- Service (SaaS) model, making it quick and easy for customers to deploy and integrate as part of their defense architecture or incident response strategies. By providing comprehensive threat awareness and pervasive visibility, the combination of Cisco and OpenDNS will enhance advanced threat protection across the full attack continuum before, during and after an attack,” the statement read.

The statement added that OpenDNS' broad visibility, unique predictive threat intelligence and cloud platform with Cisco's robust security and threat capabilities will increase awareness across the extended network, both on- and off-premise, reduce the time to detect and respond to threats, and mitigate risk of a security breach.

Hilton Romanski, Cisco chief technology and strategy officer, said that many people, processes, data and things connected because of which opportunities for security breaches and malicious threats grow exponentially when away from secure enterprise networks.

“OpenDNS has a strong team with deep security expertise and key technology that complements Cisco's security vision. Together, we will help customers protect their extended network wherever the user is and regardless of the device,” Romanski added.

New Trojan that hides in PNG images affects healthcare organizatons

A new Trojan named the Stegoloader Trojan has been reported. The most victims claimed by this trojan are based in healthcare organizations in the US.

This new Trojan hides itself in PNG imaged to infiltrate personal computers of people and collect information. The malware hides in the pixels of the images.

The trojan hides in PNG images so it is able to circumvent security measures like network firewalls and personal antivirus software.

This malware was first spotted in 2013, but since then it has been reworked many times and multiple versions of Stegoloader now exist. Dell was the first company to report this malware.

Out of all the Stegoloader victims, 42 percent are in the healthcare industry.

Penn State University Becomes Victim To Yet Another Cyberattack


Penn State announced that it has detected another cyber attack.  The recent attack has been confirmed by the university on its’s College of Liberal Arts server. 
Penn State has stated that several systems have been compromised by cyberattacks; which have been accounted as two in number by anonymous threats.

FireEye cyber forensic unit, Mandiant has taken over the case and has been trying to investigate and analyse the attacks, that took place on the 4th of May; Seven weeks since then, the university now states that no harm has occurred in regards to the personally identifiable information(PII) or any other research data, since the it had introduced advances cybersecurity measures after the attacks on the College of Engineering servers.

Mandiant’s spokesperson, Nick Pelletier revealed that the attacks took place for the first time in 2014 within a 24-hour time period, while the latter breach was taken into action during March to May in 2015. Mandiant is not sure if the attackers are the same chinese group that attacked engineering.

Nick Jones, vice-president of Penn State in an official statement said that advanced monitoring systems have been introduced into the entire university network with constant support of Mandiant and the the attackers will be soon tracked down.

The attacks in the state university systems have created a threat for federal systems. Where any PII or research data was not compromised, some college-issued usernames and passwords were stolen and accessed. As a result, all the compromised accounts are being renewed and more information can be gathered from http://securepennstate.psu.edu.

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