Anderson Cooper’s assistant to be blamed for insulting tweet to Trump

CNN says it's gotten to the bottom of Anderson Cooper's Trump-bashing tweet ... and all signs point to a forgetful assistant, who has been appointed for last 10 years.

CNN faced widespread mockery and scepticism on Wednesday after the network claimed an unidentified gym locker room thief sent a tweet from Anderson Cooper's account that called President Trump a "tool" and a "pathetic loser."

In a statement, CNN claimed the tweet in question was sent from a phone belonging to Cooper's assistant in New York while Cooper himself was in Washington D.C.
CNN said the tweet was the result of the anchor's assistant's phone being taken.

A CNN spokesperson said, "[Cooper's] assistant inadvertently left his phone unlocked and unattended at the gym early this morning and someone took the phone and sent the Tweet."

"Geolocation tools confirm that the tweet in question was not sent from Anderson Cooper’s phone," read a statement from the network. "Anderson was in Washington, and we have proof the tweet was sent from New York, from a phone belonging to his assistant."
He's apparently the only other person besides Anderson with access to the account.

BuzzFeed reporter Chris Geidner, who like Cooper is gay, tweeted in response, "I have never met a gay man who has left his phone unlocked and unattended at the gym, but OK."

The errant tweet was a response to the president on Wednesday regarding the loss of Republican candidate Roy Moore in the Alabama special election. Trump had tweeted: "The reason I originally endorsed Luther Strange (and his numbers went up mightily), is that I said Roy Moore will not be able to win the General Election. I was right! Roy worked hard but the deck was stacked against him!"

Anderson's verified Twitter account replied to Trump early Wednesday morning -- calling 45 a "tool!" and a "Pathetic loser."

AIG Launches New Cyber Threat Analysis Service to Understand Cyber Risks

American International Group Inc., an American multinational insurance company, has launched a new system for cyber threat analysis.

The system scores companies on the degree to which a cyber attack may affect their business and the potential costs involved. It compares the company’s risk of having a breach to the safeguards it has in place.

Tracy Grella, AIG’s Global Head of Cyber Risk Insurance, in an interview said, “AIG’s underwriters have been using the computerized analysis since November, which combines information from a new insurance application designed for the process and data about current cyber threats to generate scores on various related factors.”

With mounting cyber threat to businesses, this system hopes to provide a way to measure the risk involved in a business so that cyber coverage in insurance may be taken into consideration.

This comes after AIG in October said that they will review all coverage types to check for cyber risk and give insurers a clear picture about cyber coverage and estimated financial exposure. They will also create a cyber-risk report for the customers with the analysis scores for understanding and comparing.

Along with this, AIG also announced their partnership with cybersecurity companies CrowdStrike Inc and Darktrace, on Tuesday, to launch CyberMatics, a service that verifies information AIG receives from customers’ cybersecurity tools.

Darktrace Chief Executive, Nicole Eagan, said, “The service uses artificial intelligence, or the ability of machines to carry out tasks normally associated with human intelligence, to look inside an insured company’s network for strengths and vulnerabilities.”

Tracy Grella said that while companies are not required to use the service, those who do may be able to negotiate more favourable policy terms.



Trump apporves ban on use of Kaspersky Lab's anti-virus software

President Donald Trump has finally signed into a legislation that bans the use of a Russia based anti-virus software, Kaspersky Lab,  within the U.S federal agencies.

For past months Kaspersky has tried to mend their relationship with the US and has failed to clear its links with, Russian Intelligence agency, Kremlin.

"The case against Kaspersky is well-documented and deeply concerning. This law is long overdue," said Democratic Senator Jeanne Shaheen.

The anti-virus firm has been accused of allowing its anti-virus software to be used by Russian intelligence to exfiltrate information from the PCs of US government officials.

According to the New York Times report, Israel had informed United States about the Russian hackers using anti-virus software to break into NSA's computers to steal secrets.  After this, UK's cybersecurity authorities have also warned its country's agencies against using Kaspersky.

However, Kaspersky Lab has denied all the allegations.

Kaspersky's co-founder Eugene Kaspersky said: "Internet balkanisation benefits no one except cybercriminals. Reduced cooperation among countries helps the bad guys in their operations, and public-private partnerships don't work like they should.

"We need to re-establish trust in relationships between companies, governments and citizens. That's why we're launching this Global Transparency Initiative: we want to show how we're completely open and transparent.



Mailsploit: Email that permits sender spoofing

Pretending to be somebody you're not in an email has never been very sufficiently hard – all thanks to phishing, that endless scourge of web security. In any case, now one researcher recently, has uncovered another gathering of bugs in an email program that by and large strip away even the current, defective protections against email impersonation, enabling anybody to imperceptibly spoof a message with no allude at all to the recipient.

 On Tuesday, Sabri Haddouche, a developer and a bug hunter revealed a noteworthy new email spoofing strategy. Named Mailsploit, the strategy use bugs in email clients and enables hackers to dispatch imperceptible email spoofing attack, including well know clients like Microsoft outlook 2016, apple mail, Yahoo! Mail and many more.

Mailsploit has the capacity to effectively go through email servers and circumvent the already established spoofing protection like DMARC and other spam filters. This implies that if the server is configured to utilize DMARC or Domain Keys Identified Mail (DKIM) it will regard a message as genuine, regardless of whether it ought to be spam-binned. Through a demo that Haddouche has made accessible on his site depicting the Mailsploit attack gives anybody the access to send messages from whichever address they desire; thinkblue@whitehouse.gov, redpigeon.9898@gmail.com or some other made up the email address that may trap somebody into surrendering their private information and details. Mailsploit now though has made it possible that no amount of scrutiny in the email client can help uncover the fakery.

 Where is DMARC?

 Domain-based Message Authentication, reporting and conformance, which blocks spoofed emails via painstakingly sifting through those whose headers pretend to originate from an unexpected source in comparison to the server that sent them. This authentication system has progressively been embraced by different administrators throughout the years.

 In any case, Mailspoilt's tricks defeat DMARC by misusing how email servers handle content information uniquely in contrast to desktop and portable or mobile working systems. By creating email headers to exploit the imperfect execution of a 25-year-old framework for coding ASCII characters in email headers known as RFC-1342, and the peculiarity of how Windows, Android, iOS, and macOS handle content, Haddouche has demonstrated that he can surely trap email servers into interpreting the email headers in one way, while email client programs read them in a totally different way.

 The interwoven fixes 

Haddouche says he contacted the majority of the influenced firm’s months prior to caution them about the vulnerabilities he's found. Yahoo! Mail, Protonmail and Hushmail have effectively settled their bugs, while firms like Apple and Microsoft are as yet dealing with it. In any case, Mozilla and Opera both have informed him that they don't plan to settle their Mailspolit bugs as they appear of being simply server-side issues.

 Haddouche further added that email providers and firewalls can likewise be set to filter this attack regardless of whether email clients stay helpless against it. Beyond the particular bugs that Mailspolit features, Haddouche's research focuses on a more principal issue with email authentication, as security add-ons for email like DMARC were intended to stop spam, not focused on spoofing.

Nevertheless, Haddouche recommends the users to stay tuned for more security updates to email clients to fix the Mailsploit bugs. As meanwhile, it's always insightful to treat emails with caution.

iOS exploit could allow hackers to jailbreak iPhones

Google security researcher Ian Beer, who works for the Project Zero team, last week details about an iOS 11 exploit called "tfp0," which he believes could be the basis for a future jailbreak of all Apple devices running iOS 11.1.2 or below, though he only personally tested iPhone 7, iPhone 6s, and a sixth-generation iPod touch.

The revelation made on Twitter left the infosec community inflamed and curious.

On Monday (11 December), Beer Beer published details of an 'async_wake' exploit, the proof of concept and tweeted that he tested out the exploit on iPhone 7, iPhone 6s and iPod touch 6G, adding that "adding more support should be easy".

As detailed in Project Zero's bug repository, the issue Beer found relates to a memory flaw in IOSurface, a kernel extension.

It appears what Beer has released isn't a full jailbreak but enough to allow security researchers to bypass software restrictions imposed by Apple and test a newish version of iOS.

iOS 11.1.2 is no longer the current version of iOS as Apple released iOS 11.2 on December 2, but Apple is still signing iOS 11.1.2 at this time. Apple will likely stop signing the older update in the near future, and its end could come sooner now that further information on the tfp0 exploit has been released.

iOS exploits are rare and the iPhone is still considered to be one of the hardest consumer devices to hack and/or jailbreak. This makes Beer's exploit all the more valuable. In the past, researchers have been known to sell iOS exploits for significant amounts of cash. Companies such as Zerodium, that sell such exploits, has previously offered up to $1.5 million bounties to hackers who could find iOS zero-day vulnerabilities.

Jailbreaking iOS devices have dwindled in popularity in recent years, which has led two major Cydia repositories to close. Both ModMy and ZodTTD/MacCiti, which provided apps, themes, tweaks, and more for jailbroken iOS devices, shut down in November. For the time being, iOS 11 continues to be the only major version of iOS that has not been jailbroken.