QR-codes on historical buildings of Russian city Astrakhan that led to Adult sites have been removed


Hacker reportedly changed website location of the QR-codes on historical buildings of Russian city Astrakhan and replaced them with adult website link. There was no technical detail provided how hacker was able to change the location of QR code.

When residents and guests of the city scanned QR-codes, their phones opened resources for adults, instead of sites with historical references.

Galina Goteeva, the Minister of Culture and Tourism of the region, said on March 15 that the signs with QR codes on the historical buildings of Astrakhan were changed.

QR-codes on historically significant buildings of Astrakhan were placed a few years ago. It was assumed that people can get a historical reference about the building after scanning the code with a mobile phone. Already in November last year, the Media reported about QR codes leading to porn sites and dating sites for quick sex.

In fact, the Regional Ministry of Culture for a long time struggled with the elimination of porn content, the signs were removed with great difficulty. And only at the end of the year sex traffic was stopped completely.

However, it is still a mystery why the signs with QR-codes hung for so long and why they were not promptly replaced. In total, there are at least 15 signs. QR-codes stopped working more than a year ago, but officials did not pay any attention to it: first, the pages gave an error, and later they began to lead to porn sites.

Beto O’Rourke Was A Former Hacking Group Member In His Teen Days!




Beto O’Rourke, who’s better known for his candidature for the Democratic Presidential seat, has been revealed to be a part of an eminent hacking group in his teen days.


Recently in an interview for an upcoming book, O’Rourke confirmed that during his days in El Paso, he was a member of a hacking cult of the name, “Cult of the Dead Cow”.

His major tasks while in the group comprised of stealing long-distance phone service, participating stealthily in electronic discussions and related offenses.

While in the group he also took to writing online essays by the pen name of “Psychedelic Warlord”.

The essays ranged from fiction from the perspective of a killer to mocking a neo-Nazi.

According to the article, the ex-congressman was one of the most renowned former hackers of the American Politics.

The book goes by the name of “Cult of the Dead Cow: How the Original Hacking Supergroup Might Just Save the World.”

The book also encompasses the first-time mentions of the members of the aforementioned cult after they finally agreed to be named.

There is neither evidence nor insinuations as to Beto being a part of illegal hacking activities that deal with writing code or so.

The group in 1980s started getting known for hijacking others’ machines. It was all kind of controversial.

O’Rourke being a presidential candidate gets kind of in a shady side of the court with a past like this.

He was born to a high-up family in El Paso, but he also had played in a punk band before he started his small technology business and stepped into local politics.

O’Rourke’s national presence was enhanced when he defeated Texas Republican Sen. Ted Cruz during a Senate campaign.

On the brighter side, Beto’s involvement shows a profound sense of technological comprehension and a powerful will to change what’s not required.


Hacker who was offering Cybercrime-as-a-service detained in Novokuznetsk



Employees of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of Russia with the assistance of experts of Group-IB, an international company specializing in the prevention of cyber attacks, detained a hacker in Russian city Novokuznetsk who hacked computers around the world.

The detainee offered Cybercrime-as-a-service services to cyber criminals.  He created and maintained admin panels for managing malware and botnets. 
 
According to the local report, he infected more than 50 thousands computers across the world.  He managed to steal usernames and passwords from browsers, mail clients of the infected computers.  He also reportedly stole financial information such as bank card details.

The investigation began in the spring of 2018, when the hacker infected around 1000 of computers with malicious software Formgrabber.

"He administered the botnet, which counted several thousand infected computers of Russian and foreign users,” the press service of the Ministry of Internal Affairs reported.

It turned out that the hacker is only 26 years old, since 15 he has earned money by creating websites for computer games, but then he decided to learn the profession of a hacker.  More recently, he was testing malware targeting Android platform.

He has already been charged under the article "Creation and distribution of malicious computer programs". He completely admitted his guilt.

Pilots still waiting for Software Update of Boeing, which was promised last year






After a deadly crash of the Lion Air 737 MAX 8 in Indonesia in last October, company officials have met pilot union, and said that they are planning to the software for their 737 Max jets, but till now there has not been a single update.

Meanwhile, addressing the issue, the United States regulators said the software update would be ready by April.

“Boeing was going to have a software fix in the next five to six weeks,” said Michael, the top safety official at the American Airlines pilots union. “We told them, ‘Yeah, it can’t drag out.’ And well, here we are.”

The planned software update would let pilots to detect the problem, and will them from recurrence of the same problem.  Boeing officials  believe that pilots doesn't need any special training in order to learn the functioning of the software update, but they just need a small briefing on how the software fix would function.


Facebook says outage was a result of incorrect server configuration

Facebook has said that a "server configuration change" was to blame for the worst outage in its history. Facebook and its apps Instagram, Facebook Messenger and WhatsApp suffered outages for a considerable time on Thursday, affecting users for some 12 hours in most areas of the world, with the biggest impact in North America and Europe, according to the tracking website downdetector.com.

Facebook has only just offered an explanation for the problems it has experienced over the past 24 hours.

The company hasn't elaborated on what the server configuration change exactly meant nor has it said how many users were affected or why the outage took so long to fix. In a tweet, Facebook just apologised and thanked people for their patience. It said it had "triggered a cascading series of issues" for its platforms, including WhatsApp and Instagram.

"Yesterday, as a result of a server configuration change, many people had trouble accessing our apps and services," a Facebook tweet said. "We've now resolved the issues and our systems are recovering. We're very sorry for the inconvenience and appreciate everyone's patience."

The outage was believed to be the worst ever for the internet giant that reaches an estimated 2.7 billion people with its core social network, Instagram and messaging applications. It took the social network giant a full day from when the problems began to offer any explanation. It added that everything was now back to normal.

The outage brought fresh attention to the embattled social networking leader. It is yet another publicity problem for a company already dealing with privacy issues and regulatory probes.

The disruption isn’t likely to hurt advertisers much since they usually pay for ads per click or impression. But they lose potential customers who might have seen their ads when the site and apps were down. Longer term, Facebook’s reputation with advertisers and investors could be damaged, said Wedbush Securities managing director Dan Ives. It didn’t help that it took Facebook so long to explain what was going on, he said. Facebook said on Wednesday that the problem was not related to a “distributed denial of service” or DDoS attack, a type of attack that hackers use to interrupt service to a site, but didn’t provide any other details until Thursday. “In these situations, a lack of transparency is not a good look,” Ives said. “The longer something like this lasts, the more questions there are.”